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Saint Elizabeths East Gateway Pavilion

Washington, DC

St. Elizabeths East Gateway Pavilion, also known as G8WAY DC, is an open-air structure that provides a venue for casual dining, a farmers market, and other community events. The winner of a highly publicized design competition, the new pavilion is the first step of the implementation of the city’s master plan vision to transform the 180-acre Saint Elizabeths East Campus into a mixed-use development.

To achieve the illusion of the pavilion floating above land on its open end, Silman designed a 5.5-foot-deep plate girder that cantilevers 50 feet past the nearest supporting column at the northeast edge of the structure. Another 3.5-foot-deep wide flange girder at the central spine of the rooftop cantilevers nearly 30 feet past its nearest support. Silman developed a shallow structure that preserves a uniform ceiling while creating a precise and sharp profile.

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Green Roof

The pavilion’s green roof includes paved assembly areas and ADA accessible pathways. Sustainable features include roof plantings to reduce mechanical system demand and an on-site cistern that captures rain runoff and irrigates the entire site. The rooftop structure emerges from grade towards the south, cresting at a height of 24 feet at the northern tip and providing shade for the modular booths below.

Green Roof

The pavilion’s green roof includes paved assembly areas and ADA accessible pathways. Sustainable features include roof plantings to reduce mechanical system demand and an on-site cistern that captures rain runoff and irrigates the entire site. The rooftop structure emerges from grade towards the south, cresting at a height of 24 feet at the northern tip and providing shade for the modular booths below.

Working closely with Davis Brody Bond and the general contractor, Silman provided structural engineering services from concept design through construction administration, including design for retaining walls and stairs. The use of precast plank supported by steel framing means that the structure, which was designed to be temporary, can be easily disassembled. A semi-regular 30’ square column grid system supports the steel framing members, including deep plate girders necessary to allow for the project’s large cantilevers. The steel rooftop structure uses strategically placed dual-purpose concrete retaining and shear walls for lateral stability.

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Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC)

Silman also collaborated with the panel designers and providers to develop a UHPC panel support structure. This partnership was aimed at developing a cost effective, adaptable support scheme that would maximize the capacity of the UHPC panels while fitting within the tight geometries necessary to suit the architectural program.

Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC)

Silman also collaborated with the panel designers and providers to develop a UHPC panel support structure. This partnership was aimed at developing a cost effective, adaptable support scheme that would maximize the capacity of the UHPC panels while fitting within the tight geometries necessary to suit the architectural program.

The project maintained an ambitious schedule, with special attention paid to cost-effective solutions. Silman was able to decrease overall steel tonnage by utilizing a composite metal deck system and unique facade support system. The construction administration process lasted only three months, necessitating shop drawing review and approval turnarounds in a matter of hours.

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